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Nikola Tesla
In the annals of scientific history, few figures shine as brightly as Nikola Tesla. Often draped in the shadows of contemporaries like Thomas Edison, Tesla’s genius paved the way for many of the electrical wonders we now take for granted.

Hailing from modern-day Croatia, Tesla was born in 1856 into the age of invention. He displayed early signs of his genius, purportedly creating a bug-powered motor at 16. His thirst for knowledge eventually led him to America, the land of dreams and possibilities.

Perhaps Tesla’s most celebrated contribution is the development of alternating current (AC) electrical systems. While Edison’s direct current (DC) systems had limitations over long distances, Tesla’s AC system could efficiently transmit electricity across vast expanses, revolutionizing power distribution. Today, AC remains the global standard.

Tesla envisioned a world connected wirelessly, predicting innovations similar to modern-day Wi-Fi and smartphones. At Colorado Springs, he built a lab where he conjured artificial lightning, leading locals to whisper tales of mad-scientist endeavors.

While Edison knew how to market himself and his inventions, Tesla was more an archetypal “mad genius.” Sadly, he died relatively penniless in 1943. But as we toggle switches, charge our phones, and enjoy global connectivity, Tesla’s silent legacy resonates. It’s a testament to a mind that saw a future electrified, interconnected, and filled with wonder.

Further reading:  Nikola Tesla biography

This website offers a detailed biography of Tesla, descriptions of his inventions, photographs, letters, and many articles related to his work. It’s a great resource for both beginners and those already familiar with Tesla’s contributions.

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